Indiana University Overseas Study

Kaleb McCain

As the snow melts away in Bloomington, drawing the students out to the grassy fields of Woodlawn for their first game of frisbee, Spring begins to sneak her sunny, blue skies in between the polar vortex days of an Indiana winter. However, at this moment I am not concerned with having a picnic in Dunn meadow or taking a peaceful walk down the B-line trail because I’m too busy scrambling to line up my ducks before departing for a semester abroad in Lima, Perú – moving out of my apartment, receiving all the necessary vaccines, notifying my bank, buying a current converter for appliances, packing my bag, getting to Atlanta to catch our departure flight, finding a host family in Lima, filing my taxes, having that final meal or drink with friends and family, and yes, even writing this blog. But don’t pity me; I’ve had over two months to prepare for these moments.

Packing

Never a bad idea to pack extra underwear.

On Tuesday, I vacated “the condo” – a third story flat located in the Villas (Stadium Crossing to the newer generation of students). “The condo” housed a variety of occupants including my two older brothers, a couple of cousins, and plenty of wonderful friends over the last seven years. Yes, there were a few bad apples that brought bedbugs amongst other things, but the end of such a grandiose residential dynasty only adds to the feeling that I’m closing one door (literally) and opening another.

During my final visit with my grandma we played a couple games of Yahtzee – the standard activity anytime someone comes to visit Grandma. As the dice clattered around inside the cup, I found myself thinking about one of Dan Carlin’s Hardcore History podcasts. In the podcast, Mr. Carlin discussed how remarkable and extraordinary a situation must be in order for a population to realize that they themselves are living through a moment of significant change in history. Then a thought struck me – I as an individual am living through a moment of significant change in my own life. Fate is funny. Sometimes these moments are brought about by some minute decision, such as deciding to eat lunch in the Wright food court with a cute girl, which leads to being in a romantic relationship for nearly two years (she’s studying in Lima as well!). But no, this was one of those momentous decisions, like taking a new job or having a child, that can have such a great effect on one’s life that you feel the ripples of consequence stretch back from the future and alter your reality before the event has even transpired. “It’ll be a wonderful experience,” said Grandma as we wrapped up our game of Yahtzee. Wonderful is only the tip of the iceberg.

The parts of my life I didn’t stuff into my backpack now lie stacked in the entrance of my parent’s home. Kitchenware, camping gear, clothes, office supplies, a couple guitars, and random trinkets sit in duct-taped boxes until my return in August. August. Five months. I can’t help but wonder, what all will happen while I’m gone? How much will my sister-in-law’s new kitten grow? Will Tom Crean learn how to coach offense against a zone? Will my little cousin be walking and talking? It seems like a long time, but I know it will fly by before I even have time to grasp it.

Last Meal

The last lunch.

With a little luck and a lot of help, I’ve managed to line up the majority of the aforementioned ducks in the last couple weeks. There were definitely moments of anxiety brought on by the sheer magnitude of the decisions and plans being laid in front of me like a set of trembling dominoes. I didn’t even know where I would be staying in Lima until two weeks ago. Who wouldn’t feel that anxiety? I’m an American student who grew up in rural central Indiana, traveling to a country I’ve never been to where a language I can just barely understand is spoken, to live in an enormous city with a woman I’ve never met. But hey, life’s an adventure. Either the reality of the decision has escaped me or my anxieties have simply subsided, leaving behind a sense of excitement, curiosity, anticipation, and wonder that are smoking inside me like the barbecue ribs that I chowed down on for my final lunch in the United States.

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